Alum Feature: Kevin Kehl

KevinKehl

Kevin Kehl graduated from NKU in 2012 with a BA in English and a minor in Medieval and Renaissance Studies.  He’s currently completing a MA in Literature at the University of Massachusetts Boston and is planning to apply to apply to PhD programs. 

What are you up to now?  Can you tell us a bit about your transition into the MA English Lit program at UMASS Boston?

Currently I am finishing my last semester in my Master’s program at the University of Massachusetts Boston and writing my thesis as well. In the upcoming fall, I plan on applying for Ph.D. programs. Besides my own studies, I teach a course at the University and I am also working with a professor to coordinate a study abroad trip this summer in Siena, Italy.

Once I graduated from NKU, I moved to Boston at the end of the summer to begin my M.A. in English Literature. My transition into the program was actually very exciting. I was one of many transplants into the city with many colleagues from different parts of the country. The idea of moving into a city with no previous connections was a bit nerve-racking, but the faculty and fellow students have provided a wonderful atmosphere for learning. For me, it has been a very profitable decision in both my academic career and personal life—mostly because Boston is an amazingly vibrant city, packed full of opportunities. The city is never a dull moment! Of course, running into random NKU professors at conferences is nice as well!

What is one of your greatest memories and/or greatest lessons from your time at NKU?

Hmm…that’s a tough question. Well the greatest memories, I will say, have always come from the interaction with the English faculty in-and-out of the classroom. Particularly, I always looked forward to the energetic classes taught by the professors. Topics such as Shakespeare, Faulkner, Romanticism, and…I hate to say it…Literary Theory, always seemed to be fun even at their most grueling moments. The best parts were being able to have study groups and conversations with other people about the things we enjoyed or suffered. I know that one semester, our theory class banded together to form a study group to help us understand what the heck these guys like Foucault, Derrida, and Barthes were teaching us. On a separate occasion, a bunch of students and faculty would get together to read and discuss novels written by Charles Dickens. The overarching sense of community that I found in the English department was the most enjoyable experience I had as an English major.

What is your main research interest?

Besides trying to find a steady balance between work, sleep, and personal freedom, my main research interest focuses primarily on literature of the English Renaissance and Romantic periods. My current research project aims to look at the influences of Edmund Spenser’s The Faerie Queene on the ‘mature’ poetic style of John Keats.

Do you have any advice for our current students?

Find what you love. Do what you love. Don’t miss out on your opportunity. I say this with a grain of salt, because, sometimes life does hit you hard. If you are serious about your goals in school and life, don’t delay them any further. Read your material, write your papers, make friends with faculty and students; become immersed within your profession. You don’t want to be sitting on a park bench one day, pondering the meaning of your life, and say: “Wow, I really wish that I did that while I had the chance.” Of course this may sound like typical motivational mumbo-jumbo, but hey, they keep preachin’ it for a reason. Overall, know what you want to do with your life and have goals set to help yourself get there, but be smart about it. Have a backup plan prepared in case you don’t make it your first or second time. Of course, enjoy it all while it is happening.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s