Tagged: literature

Alum Feature: Kevin Kehl

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Kevin Kehl graduated from NKU in 2012 with a BA in English and a minor in Medieval and Renaissance Studies.  He’s currently completing a MA in Literature at the University of Massachusetts Boston and is planning to apply to apply to PhD programs. 

What are you up to now?  Can you tell us a bit about your transition into the MA English Lit program at UMASS Boston?

Currently I am finishing my last semester in my Master’s program at the University of Massachusetts Boston and writing my thesis as well. In the upcoming fall, I plan on applying for Ph.D. programs. Besides my own studies, I teach a course at the University and I am also working with a professor to coordinate a study abroad trip this summer in Siena, Italy.

Once I graduated from NKU, I moved to Boston at the end of the summer to begin my M.A. in English Literature. My transition into the program was actually very exciting. I was one of many transplants into the city with many colleagues from different parts of the country. The idea of moving into a city with no previous connections was a bit nerve-racking, but the faculty and fellow students have provided a wonderful atmosphere for learning. For me, it has been a very profitable decision in both my academic career and personal life—mostly because Boston is an amazingly vibrant city, packed full of opportunities. The city is never a dull moment! Of course, running into random NKU professors at conferences is nice as well!

What is one of your greatest memories and/or greatest lessons from your time at NKU?

Hmm…that’s a tough question. Well the greatest memories, I will say, have always come from the interaction with the English faculty in-and-out of the classroom. Particularly, I always looked forward to the energetic classes taught by the professors. Topics such as Shakespeare, Faulkner, Romanticism, and…I hate to say it…Literary Theory, always seemed to be fun even at their most grueling moments. The best parts were being able to have study groups and conversations with other people about the things we enjoyed or suffered. I know that one semester, our theory class banded together to form a study group to help us understand what the heck these guys like Foucault, Derrida, and Barthes were teaching us. On a separate occasion, a bunch of students and faculty would get together to read and discuss novels written by Charles Dickens. The overarching sense of community that I found in the English department was the most enjoyable experience I had as an English major.

What is your main research interest?

Besides trying to find a steady balance between work, sleep, and personal freedom, my main research interest focuses primarily on literature of the English Renaissance and Romantic periods. My current research project aims to look at the influences of Edmund Spenser’s The Faerie Queene on the ‘mature’ poetic style of John Keats.

Do you have any advice for our current students?

Find what you love. Do what you love. Don’t miss out on your opportunity. I say this with a grain of salt, because, sometimes life does hit you hard. If you are serious about your goals in school and life, don’t delay them any further. Read your material, write your papers, make friends with faculty and students; become immersed within your profession. You don’t want to be sitting on a park bench one day, pondering the meaning of your life, and say: “Wow, I really wish that I did that while I had the chance.” Of course this may sound like typical motivational mumbo-jumbo, but hey, they keep preachin’ it for a reason. Overall, know what you want to do with your life and have goals set to help yourself get there, but be smart about it. Have a backup plan prepared in case you don’t make it your first or second time. Of course, enjoy it all while it is happening.

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Alum Feature: Sara Moore

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Sara Moore with her son, Cohen, and her fiancé, Jon Wagner.

Recent MA grad, Sara Moore, talks about teaching in Korea, her studies at NKU, and her work as a poet.  

You spent three years teaching in Korea.  What was that like? How did you find this program and secure the position?
It was a phenomenally life changing experience. I first heard about the opportunity through a friend who was already living there. She helped me find a good recruiter who placed me in an amazing school. Recruiters can often be motivated solely by self-interest, but I found Footprints Recruiting to be extremely helpful and attentive to my needs as a foreigner (it’s run by previous teachers). It’s hard for me to sum up such a long and complex experience. I will say that I feel so differently about the world now, and about people. I think it’s easy to get caught in a worldview bubble, which is fed by media, etc. To get out and live in the world was a gift to me. It was at times beautiful, terrifying, boring, enriching, and humbling. It was like living anywhere else; you get used to it and it becomes a part of who you are. For me, it gave me a deeper sense of adventure, and a real love of teaching. The kids were the best part!

Why did you choose the MA program at NKU?
I chose this program because it really met all my needs. I had been out of school for seven years, and back in the US for about three. I was teaching at the high school level and raising my young son, but I wanted to be able to further my education that I might have more employment opportunities. I wasn’t sure that an MFA would do this for me, and at this time I wasn’t writing much poetry (I have a BFA in poetry from BGSU). The program here did not pressure me to decide what I wanted to do/study right away. I was allowed to explore and choose my own path. It was also affordable and offered all evening classes, which worked well for me as a single mom.

How has writing poetry changed your life?
I feel like I’ve always been a poet…I know it sounds cheesy. When I was as young as seven or eight, I would write my diary entries as rhymed poems. I don’t know if I thought this would make it harder for my brother to figure out what I was really saying or what. Regardless, I’ve always loved poetry. It helps me make sense of the world and my connection to it. Reading poetry does the same thing for me. My first poetic love was H.D., reading her made me want to learn and explore the world, and to play with language. She also led me to mythology, which is another passion of mine.

During the seven years between my BFA and MA, I wasn’t writing poetry as much, for whatever reason. Coming back to poetry through the writing program at NKU changed my life significantly. I am much more balanced and happy, and I’ve met an amazing community of writers who push and support me. I’ve learned to connect with my own voice, and to be regimented in my writing and revising.

Tell us about your recent publications.
One of the things I’m most proud of recently is my acceptance into Vine Leaves’ Best of 2013 anthology for my poem “Imaginary Bodies.” Also, two poems from my capstone project, “His Coffin” and “Explaining Origins and Ending” will soon be featured in Arsenic Lobster. Over the past year, my poems have appeared or are scheduled to appear in The Rappahannock Review, The Red Rose Review, The San Pedro River Review, and Illuminations. 

What are you up to now?
I am currently teaching as an adjunct at NKU and at a private school for homeschoolers. This schedule allows me to spend a lot of my time with my son, who is just finishing preschool. I recently got engaged, and am looking forward to starting the next chapter of my life. I also see a PhD on the horizon.

Any advice for current students and recent grads?
My main advice is to make connections with both faculty and students, especially if you are a writer. This world has so many distractions. It’s easy to get off-task, or to forget things we promise ourselves we’ll do. Meet people who will help you be that person you want to be, and help them too.  Offer the best of yourself in every class, and in the feedback you give your peers. Be present and engaged and take every opportunity you can.

Alum Feature: Ashley Theissen

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Ashley Theissen (Spring 2009) shares how she decided to attend graduate school, her fondest memories while at NKU, and advice for current students.  She’s currently a PhD student in 20th century and contemporary U.S. fiction at Indiana University, and she maintains a professional blog at ashleytheissen.wordpress.com .

What are you doing?  What have you been up to?
I just took my qualifying exams in September. I will start working on my dissertation this spring. While I am still figuring out my project, I plan on working on fictional representations of marginal figures such as the homeless, addicts, and the mentally ill. I want to explore how these figures articulate with other historical reasons for marginalization in the U.S., such as race, class, gender, and sexuality.

After I graduated NKU, I spent 9 months working at Keystone Bar and Grill in Covington, my place of employment during undergrad. I decided to take a year to focus on applying for graduate school instead of doing so while I was finishing up my degree. I know now that this was the right decision! Not only did it give me the necessary time for the application process, but it also allowed me to spend time with friends and family before moving away. I also met the man who is now my husband during this “gap” year!

How did you know you wanted to go to graduate school?  What helped your decision to attend where you are now?
I think I was a sophomore in high school when I decided I wanted to be a professor. At the time, I thought I wanted to do history. When I started college (at Kentucky Wesleyan College in Owensboro, Kentucky) I decided to major in Political Science and Art. After a few semesters, I realized I was much more interested in my English classes! So I switched majors, but my professional goals remained the same. For me, graduate school was always a necessary step to get to where I wanted to go.

I applied during a very competitive year, so my decision to attend IU was partially based on the fact that I got in! with funding! If you are trying to decide where to go to graduate school, it is important to create that initial list with care. You may only get into a few places, even if you apply for 8-10 schools. So, for me, I only applied to programs I had thoroughly researched and felt comfortable attending. I was thrilled when I got accepted to IU, because it is a very strong program with amazing faculty.

What is one of your fondest memories of NKU?
I have so many. Really! Let’s see… Almost every memory I have of taking classes in the Honors House is a highlight. I was able to create documentaries for class projects, go on amazing field trips, and build a really cool community with students and teachers there. But I think my most important memory is one that has gained significance over time: it was in the final months of my senior year, and I had just turned in a mediocre draft of my senior thesis (on Kate Chopin and Virginia Woolf) to my advisor, Tonya Krouse. After reading the draft, Tonya set up a meeting with me. She told me I had two options: 1) do final edits and “call it” because I had already done more than enough work to fulfill the requirement, or 2) dig deep and find the energy to complete the project I had set out to write. This was a moment of reckoning for me. It does not sound like a “happy” memory, I know, and at the time I certainly was not happy! But over the years, when I have had, again and again, to dig deep and find the tenacity and persistence that I feel like I have lost, I remember that conversation. And I remember that I did choose option 2, and I did my best to produce the document I wanted to, despite the difficulty of my senior year. And a happier memory to end on: when I presented that same paper at the NKU Honors Colloquium, John Alberti asked me what I would change about transatlantic scholarship if I could. I began my answer “Well, if were in charge of English everywhere….” That’s all you need to know. The confidence of a undergrad!

What are you reading now?
Critical things to “fill in the gaps” about my exam period, so, at the moment, Brian McHale’s Postmodernist Fiction (1987). I am also rereading everything Junot Díaz has written because he is visiting IU this spring and I love his work more than anything ever!

Do you have any advice for current students?
Study the fields you excel at and the ones you really love. Because I am now a teacher as well as a student, I find myself helping my students with letters, advice, career searches, etc. So many careers today require a degree, but not a specific one. So if you are worried about getting a job, the best thing to do is study something you can be proud of, and that you can talk about with grace and expertise. If you try to bet on the “right” major, but you get it wrong or it isn’t the right fit for you, it won’t make a difference anyway. So do what you love, AND work really hard to figure out how you are gaining the critical thinking, communication, cultural awareness, and other skills that will serve you throughout your life, no matter what your job title is or how many times you change careers. Take this time to learn about yourself and the world you live in, and no matter what, it will be worthwhile time spent.

What do you know now that you wish you knew when you were at NKU?
Graduate school is so much harder than I could have imagined! But everyone told me that… it is one of those things I could not have known then. And maybe that is for the best, after all.