Tagged: Shakespeare

Faculty Feature: Dr. Parmita Kapadia

Dr. Parmita Kapadia, Associate Professor of English at NKU, discusses her research and her reasons for pursuing English Studies. She also offers advice for current students.

Please tell us about your recent publication.

My most recent publication, Bollywood Shakespeares, is an essay collection that explores how the Indian sub-continent has appropriated, adapted, and consumed Shakespeare. Specifically, the book traces the historical origins of Bollywood’s engagement with Shakespeare’s plays and examines how the Bard continues to be reimagined and reproduced through Bollywood conventions, styles, imagery, choreography, costuming, and music. This book builds on my previous scholarship on Shakespeare in a global context.

How did you know you wanted to become an English major and then a professor?

I actually did not major in English. I majored in Economics and Finance; my plan was to get an MBA and work on Wall Street. I still enjoy reading and learning about financial management. I was an English minor and had a professor who coaxed, cajoled, and finally pushed me to think about pursuing a doctorate in English. First he encouraged me to take a few more English courses. Then, he suggested I help the then-still-being-formed English Club write a budget and with general management issues. I loved being in the club; it was great to be with people who loved to read about, talk about, think about, and write about literature as much as I did. I wanted to keep reading and writing and I hoped to learn how to produce scholarship. At that point I realized I needed to get the Ph. D. I am still in touch with my former professor and I asked him if his getting me involved with the English Club through my economics background was intentional. He just smiled. I guess I can give him the credit or the blame.

What do you think is important for our current majors and recent graduates to know?

I think it is important for our majors to challenge themselves. Students should take courses in areas that are unfamiliar to them and in areas that sound hard or unusual. They should not be afraid of stepping out of their cocoons and trying something completely different. College should be a time of learning and experiencing new things and our majors should take advantage of this time.

Any current projects?

My current project focuses on how literature and immigration law represents and treats characters/individuals who come to the United States on various types of visas. Particularly, I am interested in individuals—most of them are women—who enter the US on what is known as a “Dependent Spouse” visa. This visa does not allow recipients to work, access public services, and in some cases drive, have a bank account, or rent a residence. Postcolonial literature’s depiction of such characters and immigration law’s treatment of them provides a space through which to examine issues of gender, race, and global capitalism.

Anything else you would like to tell us?  (For example, I know you have to balance lots as professor, writer, mother, wife, and daughter. You must know a great deal about balancing such roles.)  

Balancing different roles is the key to being productive, but it is important to keep one’s focus.

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